20th Anniversary of the "Storm Of The Century"

20 years since the storm of the century

Baltimore, MD - Today marks the 20TH anniversary of the storm of the century. On March 12, 1993, an area of low pressure quickly strengthened into a major storm. This particular storm will be remembered for its intensity, size, and far reaching impacts to numerous states across the eastern seaboard. This storm stretched from Canada to Cuba tearing up the eastern seaboard for several days. Areas along the gulf coast states received up to a foot of rain while hurricane force winds and tornadoes were reported along the eastern side of Florida. A storm surge was generated in Tampa bay reaching 12 feet and higher flooding many living along the coastline. Winds gusted to 100 mph along the east coast of Florida as a squall line developed along the storm front. Super cells produced eleven tornadoes in the US with one tornado killing three people. More people died from drowning in this storm than during Hurricane Hugo and Andrew combined. 18,000 homes and a total of 47 lives were lost in Florida from a NON hurricane.

IMAGE: ACCUWEATHER.COM



As the storm moved north the winds picked up and blizzard conditions formed along the Appalachian mountains. Parts of the foothills of WV, VA, NC, and MD saw more then 3.5 feet of snow with snow drifts reaching 35 feet! Chattanooga, TN received 2-4 feet of snow causing emergency winter declarations to be issued since the city was ill equip to deal with major snow. The strong winds and snow shutdown airports from Halifax to Atlanta stranding travelers across the country. Motorists caught off-guard from the storms intensity and blinding snow were stranded in their vehicles and even froze to death.

In the storms wake, 300+ people died and 6.6 billion dollars in damage was sustained. The storm of 1993 was ranked the most impactful winter storm to hit the Northeast.


In Baltimore, the storm dropped a foot of snow and set a new barometric pressure of 28.51 inches. Winds gusted close to 70 mph as the storm moved over Maryland. Parts of Deep Creek and Garrett county saw 3 feet of snow by March 5th 1993. Eleven people lost their life in Virginia, one in Washington D. C and one in Maryland.