Local leaders pushing Maglev high-speed rail project, some not on board

Baltimore to DC in 15 minutes?  How about a 5 minute train ride from downtown to Baltimore Washington Thurgood Marshall Airport?

Local leaders are pushing for the high-speed Maglev project.  But it's not just quicker commutes that make it attractive it could lure businesses like Amazon to Baltimore.

But not everyone is on board.

"This train, the two paths that it looks like they're going to run could absolutely decimate thousands of people's homes," Anne Arundel County resident, Rebecca McHugh, told ABC2.

McHugh lives in Anne Arundel County.  She says the Maglev project wont be a welcome convenience even with its promise of more jobs and an economic boom.

"This is my family's plot back here and we would be really in dire straights as would all the people affected by this," McHugh said.

If the high speed rail project gets the green light it could cost $10-12 billion dollars.

"We are middle class folks and we just can’t afford to pick up and leave.  We have our homes, our businesses our families, everything here," said McHugh.

The Northeast Maglev train is expected to travel 300-miles per hour from D.C. to New York, with a stop in Baltimore.

"It would not benefit any person in this immediate area that's being directly affected by it," said McHugh.

But it would affect commuters.

"If it speeds up the commute I'm all for it.  I don't know what it would mean for taxes and how the ramifications are there but think it's good if it speeds everything up," Baltimore County resident, Leigh Kaplan, said.

In an area drained from daily gridlock, the Maglev could be be a welcome reprieve.

"It sounds very good, it gets you where you have to go in a hurry," commuter Mary Dennison-Pennant, told ABC2.

This project has raised $65 million dollars so far and it is expected to be funded with federal and private money.    

Five public meetings are set to discuss the proposal; the first one is Saturday at Bowie State University.

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