Councilwoman wants school district to hand over every speed/red light camera ticket

BALTIMORE - An ABC2 News investigation that uncovered hundreds of local school bus drivers blowing through red lights and speeding is already getting reaction.

The investigation showed drivers from Baltimore County and Baltimore City caught breaking the law by speed and red light cameras, with district drivers racking up more than 200 citations , according to public records.

Those two districts pay more than 300 contractors to transport children, and ABC2 News discovered those contractors are not required to notify the districts about camera citations. Baltimore City Councilwoman Mary Pay Clarke considers that problematic. 

Clarke tells ABC2 she plans to introduce a bill to council on November 19th that will force greater accountability for the men and women who transport city students.

The bill will require Baltimore City Public Schools to supply copies of every camera citation issued to school bus drivers, both public and private, on a quarterly basis. Clarke wants copies supplied not only to members of council but also Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake and the Baltimore City Board of School Commissioners.

To watch our investigation, click here .

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